Short Film: The Reinvention of Normal

I’ve been featured in a short film by Liam Saint-Pierre who followed me around while I tried to think of new ideas. He even travelled up north with me to talk to my parents. You can view the film here….

“Go straight off the wall” said his dad and Dominic does just that. This film follows Dominic Wilcox, an artist / inventor / designer, on his quest for new ideas….Transforming the mundane and ordinary into something surprising, wondrous and strangely thought provoking.

Directed & Produced by Liam Saint-Pierre (liamsaintpierre.com)
Edited: Sam White
Post Production: The Whealhouse (thewhealhouse.com)
Original Artwork & animation: Dominic Wilcox
Additional Animation: Shroom studios (shroomstudio.com)
Original Music: Olly Jenkins (ollyjenkins.com)
Sound Mix: Iain Grant
Dominic Wilcox’s project website: dominicwilcox.com
Dominic’s book ‘Variations on Normal’ : dominicwilcox.com/the-book

The Reinventing of normal
The film features a quick idea by me to listen to birds by attracting them with a tray of bird seed on a pole with a listening horn and tube.

TRON_06

stainedglassdriverless

The Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the future goes for a spin.

fatherandson

Dominic and his father Derek.

What to do when you spill red wine on your carpet

The sight of red wine spilling on a cream carpet has traumatised many before. Panic kicks in and various desperate methods are used to remove the stain. However my idea is quite the opposite of this approach. Let’s make the most of this bordeaux blunder. With careful attention the red blemish can be enlarged to create a beautiful replica of an ornate rug…

rugspiller2

Stained Glass Driverless Car of the Future

stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox

Dominic Wilcox in his Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car. (all photos by Sylvain Deleu)

In September 2014 I was asked by MINI the car people and Dezeen.com the design blog to create my ‘vision for the future of mobility’. I thought about driverless, automated vehicles and how they are an inevitable part of our future world. I needed to focus my mind on a year so I chose 2059, 100 years after the launch of the original Mini car. I proposed the idea that in 2059, driverless cars will be common place, in fact there will be motorways on which only driverless cars are allowed. This will mean that they are extremely safe and will have zero collisions. It will become far safer to ride in a computer controlled car than a human driven car. This means that car designers will be free to concentrate on creating a ‘living space on wheels’. No longer bound by modern day bumpers, airbags and other safety requirements etc.

stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox

I decided to demonstrate this vision of a safe future by making a stained glass car with only a bed inside. Glass being extremely fragile and sleeping being the most vulnerable time we have. I was inspired by a trip to Durham Cathedral in the North East of England where I am from. In my car, the passenger will be transported to their chosen destination while they rest or sleep. Once they arrive they will wake up covered in coloured glass reflections.
stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox  stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox stained glass driverless car by Dominic Wilcox
To make the car I needed to design and build the chassis frame/base. Here I worked closely with Middlesex University Product Design Department lead by Wyn Griffiths, technical tutor Neil Melton and recent star graduates Chris Brennan and Harry Bradshaw. They were a huge help working out the wood structure that would support the glass and making it. Once this frame was made I took it to ‘Lead and Light’ a stained glass workshop in Camden, London. I took a 5 day course in stained glass making and started work cutting and soldering the glass onto the car. I was advised by stained glass expert Lynette Wrigley and assisted by Massimo Cappella.

The making of the base and frame took about 5 weeks and the glass also about 5 weeks. It was very much a case of working it out as we went along. The car was revealed during the London Design Festival at an exhibition called Design Junction. It has received a huge amount of interest from press and media and is currently travelling from exhibition to exhibition in the UK.
crafts magazine glass car

I also made a fictional website where you could order your driverless taxi to pick you up and take you where you wish. www.taxirobot.co.uk

Window of ideas for the Selfridges ‘Festival of Imagination’.

selfridges window Dominic Wilcox

I was asked by London’s famous Selfridges department store to fill a window with my ideas and inventions for their Festival of Imagination. Over the course of two months I set about thinking up and making fourteen different objects with a plan to create something that reflected my sketchbook pages. Instead of drawing the ideas, I have made them real, but kept the handwritten descriptions and arrows all hanging from wire.  The window is open for 6 weeks so have a look if you are passing, I titled it ‘Variations on Normal’. There are so many photos and ideas to show and talk about that I will reveal the new objects each day over the next week or so rather than in one big lump.

I hung the window over four nights, we were all allowed in the shop from 9.30pm till 6am so it was very tiring.

Keep checking back each day to see the objects I came up with and pictures of me using them around town.

sidewindow

windows

people

frontfull

window before

Me in the window at the beginning thinking ‘why didn’t I come up with something simpler’ (which is a common thought for nearly every project I do).

Waiting Room

st philips

This grand old building in central London is being demolished from today to make way for a new student union building at LSE. I was amazed to find this out and I am sure there will be many in that area that will get a bit of a shock when it starts.

I was contacted about making something in the building for a quickly organised exhibition that referenced it’s life and history in some way. The St Philips building started in 1903 as a workhouse Infirmary for the poor before going on to be a hospital for women and then bought by the London School of Economics.

I was shown around the building, all rooms were empty apart from one remaining locked office that was abandoned with all it’s contents intact. I thought that it was as if the room was waiting to die and I wanted to ease its transition from this world.

I double and triple checked that the contents of the room were no longer wanted and they were left to the fate of demolition.

My thought for the office was to leave it intact but to remove the colour from every aspect in the room (via white paint) thereby taking away a layer of reality and connection to our world as it moves closer to its imminent death.

In order to distance the room from our world further I decided to keep the door locked so people had to peer in through the small window.

Waiting room by Dominic Wilcox

waiting room

waiting room


Waiting Room by Dominic Wilcox
An installation at St Philips Building, Sheffield st, London, WC2A 2EX
Exhibition: Students, Patients, Paupers
You can see the planned new building including a video of the old building here
Larger images on my Project site dominicwilcox.com and flickr.

Finger-Nose hits headlines

I’ve been amazed at the amount of press my latest post has received. I’ve just heard it will be on the popular UK programme Have I Got News For You on BBC 2 tonight (14/5/11) at 9pm. It’s one of my favourite shows and I am preparing myself to be humorously (hopefully) abused in front of the nation. UPDATE For those who missed me on Have I got News For You bbc2 its here.


I was interviewed by Paul Coyte yesterday on the UK’s national radio station Gold you can listen to it here…


America’s national public radio NPR did a nice little piece on it here…


It has been featured on The Discovery channel in Canada see here (after the ads)

It was also in the Metro newspaper in London.
And it’s been all over the web. It is interesting how things start spreading out across different media.


To go to the original Finger-Nose post click here

Finger-nose™ Stylus for Touch Screens

I sometimes use my touchphone in the bath. I know it’s stupid. One problem I encounter is that when put my left hand in the water without thinking, it gets wet and unusable for touchscreen navigation. It is too risky to try to hold and navigate with one hand. I found that I could use my nose to scroll but I couldn’t see where my nose was touching precisely. It was at that point that I came up with this idea of a nose extension ‘finger’ that would allow navigation while my phone is firmly held by one hand.

I did send a tweet from the bath last night which was typed as ‘Hello I am tweeting with my nose’ unfortunately due to the phone’s
auto-correct it sent it as…

I lost 2 followers.

It’s also very handy when out and about multi-tasking on a cold day while wearing gloves. I imagine it would be a great accessory for iPad users.

I bought a handheld stylus that I embedded in the plaster nose. The plaster comes mixed with fibres that make it look hairy.


Although this is handy for me in the bath and outdoors it touches on possible uses for people without use of a hand. Though the design could be made more ‘subtle’ for everday use maybe coming from around the neck.

UPDATE: see the amazing amount of press this received here
It was on BBC’s Have I got News for You here

If you like this you might find my other projects interesting listed on the left menu like my Speed creating project where I made something creative each day for 30 days.
Follow me on twitter or facebook.

Celebrity observations

Lady Gaga fringe and eyelashes

For the new website launch of sightunseen.com I was asked to do some sketches. I did about six pages on the shallow theme of celebrity (Kanye West grabbing, Gordon Ramsey swearing, Madonna dancing and Tom Cruise bouncing). To see them all and an article about me go here.

je ne regrette rien (ish)

tombstone speaker system for regrets

I have a regret that I didn’t say  ‘I love you’ enough to someone  before they passed on. I was shy and quiet as a child and I think those direct words just didn’t come out as often as they should have. Shyness can cause so many regrets about things that should have been said but weren’t.

Nov 10th, 2009